Entrance

The three lower stones at the entrance – called the threshold – once supported and secured a two-piece door, providing a durable and attractive entrance into the building. The threshold at our synagogue was replicated from Gamla – the best preserved example from a 1st Century synagogue.

Taking measurements of the door at the synagogue in Gamla

Taking measurements of the door at the synagogue in Gamla

 

Creating the groove through which the door-pegs pass to sit in place in the ground creating the axis on which the door will swing

Creating the groove through which the door-pegs pass to sit in place in the ground creating the axis on which the door will swing

 

As they were set into the wall using little or no mortar, door jambs had to be carved as square as possible. Large one-piece and two-piece limestone jambs were commonly used in synagogues throughout the Roman Period.

Threshold and door jambs are built, as capital raising and crowning continue.

The doorstep and jambs are set before the completion of the walls around them.

Door jambs

 

The door plan – researched by Professor Stephen J. Pfann – is based on evidence of ancient doors found at Qumran.

A sketch of the door for the synagogue at Nazareth Village

A sketch of the door for the synagogue at Nazareth Village

 

The door itself – built by Yeshua Drey, a specialist in ancient technology restoration – is a two-piece design of heavy oak planks, mortised and fastened together with large wrought iron nails.

Samir putting the finishing touches on the door

Samir putting the finishing touches on the door